Anthropology (BA/BS)

Shown here are the general learning goals of the program broken down into specific student learning outcomes (SLOs). These SLOs represent what a student should be able to do as a result of successfully completing this program. Student performance on these outcomes are routinely assessed by program faculty as a way of informing programmatic improvement efforts.

Goal Outcome

1. Students completing the major will think about the human experience in a complex manner using anthropological perspectives, which emphasize contextually rich analyses of human activity, human relations, and human biology through space and time.

  • 1.1 Students will be able to articulate the major concepts, methods, and questions that unite anthropology and distinguish it from other academic disciplines.
  • 1.2 Students will understand and be able to articulate the role of culture as a central organizing principle of human societies, and a powerful influence on individual experiences.
  • 1.3 Students will be able to apply anthropological theory and method in the student’s chosen subdiscipline.
  • 1.4 Students will understand and be able to articulate the ethical responsibilities and challenges inherent in the field of anthropology.

2. Students completing the major in anthropology will develop a nuanced understanding of human variation appropriate for their subdiscipline.

  • 2.1 Students will demonstrate knowledge of different cultural contexts across the globe, in which a variety of human practices have meaning.
  • 2.2 Students will be able to describe inequality in power relationships within and among cultures and the consequences of inequality for individuals and societies past and present.
  • 2.3 Students will demonstrate understanding of human biological diversity and the origins of human diversity in past and contemporary societies.
  • 2.4 Students will understand and be able to describe geographical and temporal variation in human biology, culture, and adaptation.

3. Students completing the major will develop critical thinking skills.

  • 3.1 Students will be able to demonstrate an ability to read, comprehend, and critically analyze anthropological literature and other forms of written, oral, and visual communication.
  • 3.2 Students will be able to demonstrate an ability to evaluate and critically analyze information about human evolution, the human past, and contemporary human problems.
  • 3.3 Students will be able to demonstrate an ability to identify culturally-determined assumptions and biases that affect different forms of scientific inquiry.
  • 3.4 Students will be able to demonstrate an ability to identify and mitigate culturally-determined assumptions and biases that impede the student’s ability to empathize with people from different backgrounds.

4. Students completing the major will be able to use theory and method in at least one sub-discipline of anthropology to analyze human contexts and raise and answer questions about human activity, human relations, and/or human biology through space and time.

  • 4.1 Students will demonstrate an ability to conduct scholarly research using published materials.
  • 4.2 Students will demonstrate an ability to collect and analyze original data using methods appropriate to the research question.
  • 4.3 Students will demonstrate an ability to use appropriate bodies of anthropological theory to analyze questions of anthropological interest.

5. Students completing the major will learn to communicate effectively.

  • 5.1 Students will demonstrate the ability to communicate effectively in written, oral, and other formats (e.g., visual formats, multimedia, etc.).

6. Students will be able to apply their knowledge of anthropological theory and methods to understand and engage with social, economic, political, and environmental problems.

  • 6.1 Students completing the major will be prepared with the knowledge, skills and perspective necessary to engage with real-world human problems throughout their lives as informed global citizens.
  • 6.2 Students in the Engaged Anthropology concentration will gain substantial knowledge of and experience in the application of anthropological theory and method to real-world problems.

7. Students will be prepared for life after graduation.

  • 7.1 Students completing the major will be prepared upon graduating to pursue graduate studies and a career in anthropology; or
  • 7.2 Students completing the major will be prepared upon graduating to pursue graduate studies or professional training in a related field, such as conservation biology, environmental science, forensic science, geography, health professions, international relations, law, library science, museum studies, natural resource management, political science, public policy, social work, and other related fields; and/or
  • 7.3 Students completing the major will be prepared upon graduating to apply the knowledge and skills developed during their study of anthropology to a variety of careers, including careers in administration, business, community development, cultural resource management, education, field archaeology, government, health-related professions, law enforcement, museum research or management, non-governmental organizations, recreation management, planning, public relations, environmental fields, etc.